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Editing well underway
20th August 2006
Director Beate Arnestad and co-director Morten Daae are now editing "My Daughter the Terrorist".
- None of us speak Tamil, but we seem to be developing a good sense of the rhythm of the language, smiles Arnestad, the director.
The team uses accurate translated transcriptions in addition to the on location translation.

- We have even used two separate translators on some of the material, to ensure we get it right, says producer and co-director Daae

 

Following the Tigers
The small team has been filming in guerilla territory for over 20 days, split between two periods half a year apart, resulting in about 40 hours of footage.

In addition to that is previously unseen archive footage.
- Some of this footage is obviously meant for propaganda use by the Tigers, but the events shown are real. Other footage is unedited, and some of it is very violent in nature, Arnestad says.
- War is bloody. Having to watch hours of fighting and the disturbing aftermaths of bombings and is hard, but of course nothing compared to experiencing it, like the soldiers and civilians on both sides of the conflict are doing right now, Daae continues.
The thin line
The team has a difficult task ahead. Any documentary set in a war zone is bound to meet challenges in the way it portrays the conflict and the people in it.

- We are very committed to not make this an extended news segment. We want to get closer than that. Our subjects are first and foremost human beings like all of us, but they have selected very unusual lives. Why? Daae asks.

- I believe that by letting the girls speak, getting to know their thoughts and dreams, we will get closer to understanding both this conflict and "terrorism" in general a little better, Arnestad says.